Borough of Yoe

150 North Maple Street, Yoe, PA 17313 • (717) 244-5904

PSAB

With so many children spending so much time indoors today, it’s no wonder nature-deficit disorder has become a significant concern, especially with their constant connection to video game systems, tablets, and phones. But as we prioritize keeping them safe, fed and nurtured, sending them outside to enjoy what the outdoors has to offer should also be a concern.

 It might take some coaxing, but if you find activities for the whole family to enjoy, you can all get in touch with nature or simply spend more time outside. Check out some of the following resources to get the ideas flowing.

 Look Right in Your Backyard

 How to Connect Children with the Natural World in Your Own Backyard
Bird Watching Helps Children Become Nature-Wise

21 Creative Outdoor Games for Families and Friends
Set Up a Soccer Field in Your Backyard
How Much Does It Cost to Build a Basketball Court?

Backyard Fun: A Night of Stargazing

 Get Out and Explore Together

 12 Nature Walk Activities for Earth Day (or Any Day!)
Parent Insider Tips: Getting Your Kids Outside with Geocaching
How to Canoe with Kids

Top Places to Camp in Pennsylvania

4 Tips When Mountain Biking with Your Child

5 Family Hikes Along the Appalachian Trail

 With so many different types of outdoor activities for your family, you can keep it close to home or take it farther afield. Even if everyone is new to hiking, camping, or fishing, trying something new and doing it together can lay the groundwork for future outdoor adventures.

CONTACT: Ellen O’Connor – 717-968-1698

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 31, 2020

The York County Solid Waste Authority Suspends Residential Electronics Recycling during Covid-19 Pandemic

 The York County Solid Waste Authority has suspended residential electronics recycling until further notice due to the Covid-19 pandemic and the need to reduce person-to-person contact.  Under Governor Wolf’s “Stay at Home” order, residents should be traveling only for essential services: Essential travel includes things like commuting to an essential job, picking up supplies like groceries and medicine, and checking on family and pets in other households.  Residents who would normally bring their electronic devices to the Authority’s free electronics recycling program should hold onto their electronic devices until the pandemic has passed.  Once it is safe to do so, the Authority will reopen electronics recycling to residents.

The York County Solid Waste Authority facilitates responsible solid waste management through an integrated strategy that emphasizes waste reduction, education, recycling and resource recovery. The Authority is the owner of the York County Resource Recovery Center in Manchester Township; and owns and operates a Recyclable Materials Drop-off Center, a Residential Electronics Recycling Program, a Yard Waste Transfer Facility, an Ash Recycling and Processing Facility and an Education Center.

#          #          #

Park & Free Little Library OPEN

It has been a tough few weeks, kids are at home, a lot of us are not working, we are lucky if we can find bread or eggs at the grocery store.  So here is some good news.  While our playground equipment has been shut down, the park is still open including our Free Little Library, and in it you will find some recent additions.  Diana has been emailing some authors to ask if they would be willing to donate a book or two to our Free Little Library.  Dr. Keith Ablow was the first to respond.  Dr. Ablow sent a box of books and included a personal note!  Some of these books have already made there way into the library.

The second person to respond was Mr. Adam Wallace, a very popular children’s book author.  Mr. Wallace sent six books all the way from Australia!  Each book has been autographed by Mr. Wallace himself!  Inside each book from Mr. Wallace will be instructions on how to send a thank you note for anyone interested.  You should see the children’s books in the next few days.

Covid-19 Coronavirus Update:
Effective 3/30/2020 Residential Operations will run as follows:

  • Trash Collection: Normal Schedule
  • Bulk (Large Item) Collection Temporarily suspended until further notice

We are implementing this temporary change so that we can focus staffing and trucks on trash and recycling collection. We are seeing large
increases in trash and due to families staying in their homes. Keeping trash cleaned up is our top priority and Bulk routes take up resources that are needed to handle the increased volume of trash. Thanks for your partnership in these challenging times!

The scheduled April 6th tax sitting has been cancelled. Any tax payments should be mailed, or taken to Fulton Bank for processing. The York Adams Tax Bureau is not accepting walk-ins at any of their locations. At this time, any payment not received by April 15th will be considered late.

Thank you everyone who has been visiting Yoe’s Free Little Library. We are thrilled with the amount of traffic the library is receiving. While we try to visit the library once a week to restock the collection, if you notice our supply is getting low please let Diana know by emailing Secretary@YoeBorough.org. Also, you are welcome to drop books off at the office is the library is full. Happy reading!

Please note that fees are going to be increased in 2020 in certain areas. Taxes will be increased a half mill, rental inspection fees are increasing to $125, Park rental fees will now be $160.

E Pennsylvania AVE will have trash picked up on Monday. Republic was having issues with ice.

We are excited to announce that Yoe’s own Free Little Library is up and running! If you have books that you would like to donate to the library but there is not room in the library you are welcome to drop them off at the Borough Office during regular office hours. If you have books that can fit in the mailbox you are also welcome to drop them off there.

Thanksgiving Holiday – November 28, 2019 Service Schedule

In observance of the holiday our normal service on Thursday November 28th will be delayed by 1 day and collected on Friday. Friday service will also be delayed 1 day and collected on Saturday. There will be no changes in service for residents serviced Monday through Wednesday of the holiday week.

Dallastown Area School District is holding a substitute teacher hiring event on Thursday, October 3, 2019. Join us in the Middle School Cafeteria: 700 New School Lane, Dallastown, PA 17313. Click here for more information.

Car Show hosted by Gift Rite Way

Oct 12, 9am – 3pm

Yoe Park

Click here for more information.

MS4 meeting to be held on September 3rd, beginning at 7PM.

We have recently been receiving complaints about chickens in the Borough.  Per our Ordinance chickens are allowed, however Roosters are not allowed, unless on a lot more than 10 acres.

 A total combined maximum of three pigeons, chickens, ducks, geese and/or similar fowl shall be kept on a lot of less than 20,000 square feet. If a lot exceeds 20,000 square feet, a maximum of 5 pounds of such fowl for each 1,000 square feet of lot area may be kept as an accessory use. If the total weight of such fowl exceeds 500 pounds, then the requirements shall be met for “raising of livestock or poultry.” roosters shall not be kept, except on a lot of more than 10 acres.

This Crossfit Challenge and 5-mile walk is presented by Bartz Bregade for suicide prevention and awareness.

Saturday, September 29, 2019
8am – 4pm

To participate in the CrossFit event the participant must have some type of CrossFit experience.  The walk for awareness will start sometime between 10 and 11 and is open to all and for a monetary donation they will receive a t-shirt.

There will be food and drink vendors on site. The raffle will be at approximately 2pm.

Kings Dominion and Soak City discount coupons available at the Borough office. Valid from 7/1/2019 to 9/2/2019.

The York County Solid Waste Authority will again be hosting our annual Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) Collection Event. This year the event will be held on Saturday, May 4, 2019 from 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM at 915 Woodland View Drive in York. The event is free for York County residents. Businesses and government entities are not eligible to participate. More information can be found on our website here:

The York County Solid Waste Authority’s Household Hazardous Waste Collection Event

We encourage you to use the above link on your municipal websites to distribute this information to your residents. Please let me know if you have any questions.

The York County Planning Commission is exploring a stormwater authority.

Come and learn how this will affect you.

On Tuesday, Sept. 25, the York County Planning Commission will hold the second of three public information sessions to discuss creating a county stormwater authority to combat flooding and water pollution in York County and the associated fees. The meeting will be at the York Learning Center (old Central High School), 300 E. 7th Ave., York, PA 17404 from 6 to 8 p.m. Doors open at 5:30 p.m.

This meeting will further educate the public on the possibility of a countywide stormwater authority and, if created, how it would operate, what services would be provided and what fees would be assessed. Planners will have an update on the process and answer questions from the public. There will also be breakout groups for property-specific items, including how this would impact individual property owners – residential, commercial, agricultural, industrial.

If approved by the York County Commissioners, a stormwater authority would address flooding and pollution problems by investing in stream restoration, erosion control and reforestation projects along waterways all around the county.

Approximately 1,100 miles of streams have been identified in York County that do not meet mandated environmental standards, and there are still many miles of streams to test. The Planning Commission has identified 215 locations on roads in the county that experience frequent flooding problems.

The county is considering this option while Pennsylvania and neighboring states work together to clean the Susquehanna River and the Chesapeake Bay. This stormwater authority would clean up local streams and help York County meet its responsibilities to reduce the amount of nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment that flows into the Susquehanna River from our waterways.

This Sept. 25 meeting is the second of three public information sessions.

The next meeting is scheduled for Nov. 8. Residents can get the latest information and submit comments at: www.yorkstormwater.com

Monday, September 3rd, 2018: Due to the Labor Day Holiday, all Penn Waste trash and recycling collections will be delayed one (1) day for the entire week. Monday customers will be collected on Tuesday, Tuesday customers will be collected on Wednesday and so on for the remainder of the week through Saturday.

To stay up to date on recycling tips and collection updates, consider following us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

Please consider forwarding this to a friend.

Penn Waste wishes all of our customers a safe and happy holiday!

Annual MS4-Stormwater meeting will be held on September 4th starting at 7 PM.

Free yard sale dates: August 31, September 1 & 2

The park rental season  closes on October 31st.  Please check our calendar for a list of available dates.  We are also taking reservations for the 2019 season!

Met-Ed customers who have a smart meter installed can now access a new Analyze Usage tool from our website www.energysavepa.com. This tool allows customers to gain a better understanding of their energy use and make more informed energy decisions. For our PA customers, the tool also provides hourly interval usage data collected from the smart meter.  A detailed Fact Sheet is available by
clicking here.

According to the 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 6.4 million Americans abused controlled prescription drugs, and most of these drugs were obtained from family and friends, often from the home medicine cabinet.

National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day, held Saturday, April 28, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., provides an opportunity for Americans to prevent drug addiction and overdose deaths. The day aims to provide a safe, convenient, and responsible means of disposing of prescription drugs while also educating the public about the potential for abuse of medications.

As the opioid/heroin crisis in Pennsylvania and nationwide rages on, this day offers the opportunity for your residents to dispose of their unwanted, unused, and expired prescription medications and keep these drugs out of improper hands.

Since the Drug Enforcement Administration first launched Take-Back Day in 2010, more than 9 million pounds of medicine have been collected from the public.

To learn more or to locate collection sites in your area, go to takebackday.dea.gov. Enter your zip code to find locations near you.

Akron, Ohio – With utility scams on the rise, real customers of FirstEnergy (NYSE: FE) utilities are speaking out about their encounters with fraudsters in a mini documentary released today. The video, “Hang Up, Don’t Pay Up: When a Scammer Calls,” features two business owners contacted by phone scammers impersonating FirstEnergy electric company employees, and provides tips for avoiding scams.

The con artists claimed the businesses had unpaid electric bills and threatened to shut off power if an immediate payment was not made. In both cases, the scammer’s phone number was falsified so the caller ID appeared to be a legitimate call, complete with an automated voice menu that mimicked that of their electric company. This common scam is called “caller ID spoofing.”

These customer stories are merely a snapshot of the ever-growing list of scams targeting utility customers across the country. Last year, FirstEnergy’s utilities received 959 reports of scams from customers—more than twice the number of reports received in 2016. The actual number of scam attempts is even higher since most are only reported to law enforcement or go unreported.

“Scammers can be very convincing and often target those who are most vulnerable, like senior citizens or business owners who rely on electric service to run their business and make a living,” said Gary W. Grant, vice president of customer service for FirstEnergy Utilities. “We want others to hear directly from victims of attempted utility scams, in hopes they’ll learn how to spot a scam in the future. Most important, if you ever receive a call demanding immediate payment to your electric utility, hang up, don’t pay up.”

With warmer weather on its way this spring, both residential and business customers should also be on alert for door-to-door visits from scammers who demand immediate payment to avoid service disconnection. Although the scammers work year-round, they are most active in the winter and summer months, when people cannot go without heat or air conditioning.

The “Hang Up, Don’t Pay Up” video is featured on FirstEnergy’s award-winning Scam and Fraud Information website. This site describes some of the most widespread schemes targeting utility customers, and offers facts and safety reminders that can help customers avoid becoming a victim of these crimes.

Customers are urged to keep the following tips in mind to help ensure the safety of their family, property and personal information:

• Customers with past-due accounts will receive a written notice of their account status, with instructions on how to avoid disconnection of service.

• While FirstEnergy representatives oftentimes make courtesy calls to customers to remind them about an outstanding balance, they would explain how a payment can be made using the established payment options. They will not demand payment over the phone or at a particular physical location.

• FirstEnergy field collectors – carrying company-issued photo identification – will offer customers with past-due accounts the opportunity to pay their bill in person before shutting them off. This does not apply to Pennsylvania customers.

• FirstEnergy does not accept prepaid debit cards or wire transfers as payment, and their representatives will not demand bank or credit card information over the phone.

• Customers who suspect a scam should hang up the phone/close the door, and call the local police then FirstEnergy. Never dial the phone number the scammers provide.

“We encourage customers to contact us directly using the phone number listed on our website and on their billing statement if they need to verify the status of their electric account or the confirm the identity of a FirstEnergy employee,” said Grant. “When in doubt, always give us a call.”

Beginning April 2, 2018 for a period of 60 days, Manchester Township will be replacing the Toronita Street bridge located between Round the Clock Diner and the York City Wastewater Treatment Plant.  During construction, access to the York County Resource Recovery Center (RRC) via Route 30 to Blackbridge Road will be restricted.  Alternative routes to the RRC include, but are not limited to the following:

From I-83 South: Take Exit 24 (Emigsville).  You will proceed on the off ramp to a traffic signal light.  At the signal light, turn left onto Church Road.  Take Church Road to the traffic signal light at the intersection of Church Road and North George Street and make a right onto North George Street.  Proceed on North George Street until you come to the traffic signal light at North George Street and Aberdeen Road.  Make a left onto Aberdeen Road and proceed to the stop sign at the intersection of Aberdeen Road and Sinking Springs Lane.  Make a right onto Sinking Springs Lane and proceed to the stop sign at the intersection of Sinking Springs Lane and Locust Lane.

Proceed straight (Sinking Springs Ln. turns into E. Locust Ln. which turns into Grim Ln.) to the four-way stop at the intersection of Grim Lane and Woodland View Drive.  At the four-way stop, proceed straight on Blackbridge Road for approximately ½ mile to the first gate entrance to the RRC.  Make a right into the Resource Recovery Center and bear right toward the scales.

From I-83 North:  Take Exit 22 (North George Street).  Proceed on North George Street to Aberdeen Road and make a right onto Aberdeen Road.  Proceed to the stop sign at the intersection of Aberdeen Road and Sinking Springs Lane.  Make a right onto Sinking Springs Lane and proceed to the stop sign at the intersection of Sinking Springs Lane and Locust Lane.   Proceed straight (Sinking Springs Ln. turns into E. Locust Ln. which turns into Grim Ln.) to the four-way stop at the intersection of Grim Lane and Woodland View Drive.

At the four-way stop, proceed straight on Blackbridge Road for approximately ½ mile to the first gate entrance to the RRC.  Make a right into the Resource Recovery Center and bear right toward the scales.

From Route 30: Follow the directions above from North George Street.

Beginning mid to late March 2018, Manchester Township will be replacing the Toronita Street bridge located between Round the Clock Diner and the York City Wastewater Treatment Plant.  The project is anticipated to be completed in June 2018.  During construction, access to the York County Resource Recovery Center(YCRRC) via Route 30 to Blackbridge Road will be restricted.  Manchester Township has not yet identified a specific start date in March, but once we are informed of one, we will pass it on to you.  Alternative routes to the RRC include, but are not limited to the following:

From I-83 South: Take Exit 24 (Emigsville).  You will proceed on the off ramp to a traffic signal light.  At the signal light, turn left onto Church Road.  Take Church Road to the traffic signal light at the intersection of Church Road and North George Street and make a right onto North George Street.

Proceed on North George Street until you come to the traffic signal light at North George Street and Aberdeen Road.  Make a left onto Aberdeen Road and proceed to the stop sign at the intersection of Aberdeen Road and Sinking Springs Lane.  Make a right onto Sinking Springs Lane and proceed to the stop sign at the intersection of Sinking Springs Lane and Locust Lane.

Proceed straight (Sinking Springs Ln. turns into E. Locust Ln. which turns into Grim Ln.) to the four-way stop at the intersection of Grim Lane and Woodland View Drive.  At the four-way stop, proceed straight on Blackbridge Road for approximately ½ mile to the first gate entrance to the RRC.  Make a right into the Resource Recovery Center and bear right toward the scales.

From I-83 North:  Take Exit 22 (North George Street).  Proceed on North George Street to Aberdeen Road and make a right onto Aberdeen Road.  Proceed to the stop sign at the intersection of Aberdeen Road and Sinking Springs Lane.  Make a right onto Sinking Springs Lane and proceed to the stop sign at the intersection of Sinking Springs Lane and Locust Lane.   Proceed straight (Sinking Springs Ln. turns into E. Locust Ln. which turns into Grim Ln.) to the four-way stop at the intersection of Grim Lane and Woodland View Drive.

At the four-way stop, proceed straight on Blackbridge Road for approximately ½ mile to the first gate entrance to the RRC.  Make a right into the Resource Recovery Center and bear right toward the scales.

From Route 30: Follow the directions above from North George Street.

FirstEnergy’s meteorologists tell us that the frigid winter temperatures predicted over the next several days for Met-Ed’s service area will likely be accompanied by wind gusts of up to 45 mph. Fortunately, the leaves are off the trees lessening their resistance but downed trees and broken limbs usually accompany high winds and are a common cause of power outages.

Met-Ed has all available line crews scheduled to work a 24-hour rotation throughout this event. Additionally, we have contract crews on stand-by. Forestry and substation crews as well as support staff, such as fleet and warehouse, also will be working round the clock.

While Met-Ed crews strive to restore service as quickly as possible, the extreme temperatures create hazardous working conditions for Met-Ed crews and may prolong our restoration efforts. In locations where power is interrupted, we appreciate everyone’s patience as we work to restore power while keeping our employees and our customers safe.

For updated information on the company’s storm preparation efforts, current outages, Met-Ed’s storm restoration process, and tips for staying safe, customers are urged to visit our 24/7 Power Center at www.firstenergycorp.com/outages. If an outage occurs, customers should call 1-888-LIGHTSS (1-888-544-4877) to report their outage or click the “Report Outage” link on www.firstenergycorp.com. Immediately report any downed wires to Met-Ed or local police or fire department and never go near a downed power line, even if you think it is no longer carrying electricity. Extra caution should be used in areas where downed lines are tangled in trees or other debris.

Please be safe and remember to always stay away from downed power lines!

Some common sense tips for getting through the cold weather include:

  • Close drapes, blinds and garage doors to retain heat.
  • Use a sturdy fireplace screen when using a fireplace or wood-burning stove to help prevent a house fire.
  • Never use a gas stove, charcoal grill or lantern intended for outdoor use inside your home as it could lead to a buildup of deadly carbon monoxide gas.
  • Only use space heaters designed for indoor use, and keep all heat sources at least three feet away from curtains, carpet or furniture that could catch on fire.
  • Avoid frozen pipes by opening faucets and maintaining a constant drip, or wrap pipes in insulation or layers of newspaper.
  • Use care when burning candles, especially around children or pets; burning candles can present a fire hazard.
  • Charge electronic devices such as cell phones, laptops and tablet computers, and keep car charging cords for those devices handy in case of a power outage.
  • Keep a flashlight, portable radio and extra batteries in the event a power interruption occurs.
  • Never use a portable generator inside the house or a closed garage. Ensure the proper generator is selected and installed by a qualified electrician. When operating a generator, power coming into the home must be disconnected. Otherwise, power from the generator could be sent back onto the utility lines, posing a danger to utility workers.
TURN YOUR CHRISTMAS TREE INTO A REAL GIFT!

The York County Solid Waste Authority is conducting a free Christmas tree recycling program for all York County residents. The program starts December 26, 2017 and continues through January 31, 2018. Residents may bring their trees to the parking lot located directly across the street from the Resource Recovery Center in Manchester Township. In addition to the Authority’s collection site, the following businesses are accepting Christmas trees: Spring Valley Mulch in Dover, 292-3476 and H & H General Excavating in Spring Grove, 225-4669. Please call these locations for hours and directions. There is no fee to residents for this program. PLEASE REMOVE: ornaments, tinsel, lights and protective bags from your tree. Many municipalities now offer curbside Christmas tree collection for their residents. Call your municipal office to see if your municipality offers a curbside collection program.

Haulers collecting dedicated loads of Christmas trees in municipal programs will be accepted at no charge during regular business hours at the Authority’s Small Load Drop-off Facility at the Resource Recovery Center. Trees collected in these programs are taken to H & H General Excavating in Spring Grove to be recycled into mulch.

Directions to the parking lot across from the York County Resource Recovery Center:

From I-83: Proceed on I-83 to Exit 21. As you come off the exit ramp, get immediately into the far left turning lane and proceed to stoplight at intersection of Toronita Street and Rt. 30E (you will see the “Round the Clock Diner” at this intersection).

At the stoplight, turn left onto Toronita Street (Toronita turns into Blackbridge Road). Proceed approximately 1 1/2 miles and follow signs to Christmas Tree Recycling drop-off.

From Rt. 30: At the stoplight at the intersection of Toronita Street and Rt. 30 (you will see the “Round the Clock Diner” at this intersection), turn north onto Toronita Street (Toronita turns into Blackbridge Road). Proceed approximately 1 1/2 miles and follow signs to Christmas Tree Recycling drop-off.

This is the 30th year the Authority has conducted a Christmas tree recycling program.  The Authority facilitates responsible solid waste management through an integrated strategy that emphasizes waste reduction, education, recycling and resource recovery.  The Authority is the owner of the York County Resource Recovery Center in Manchester Township; and owns and operates a Small Load Drop Off Facility, a Recyclable Materials Drop-off Center and an Education Center.

Harrisburg, PA – As a tremendous number of people, businesses, and service organizations throughout the country begin collecting and donating goods and services to assist storm survivors in Texas, the Pennsylvania Department of State, Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency and Office of Attorney General Josh Shapiro want Pennsylvanians to know how they can best help and not hinder rescue and recovery efforts while also protecting themselves.

While donations of goods such as food and clothing are well-intentioned, unsolicited materials can overwhelm organizations that are tasked with helping survivors but are unprepared to store, sort and distribute large quantities of donated goods.

“This storm’s impact will be felt for years to come along the Gulf Coast,” said PEMA Director Richard D. Flinn, Jr. “Many people feel compelled to help those impacted by the storm, but please do so in a way that will truly help storm survivors, while also protecting yourself financially from those who might try to take advantage of your generosity.”

The most useful form of assistance is donations of money. Make check and credit card donations to well-established, charitable organizations that are assisting the flood relief effort. Monetary donations allow charitable organizations the flexibility to purchase items that are needed most, and, unlike material donations, entail no transportation costs.

All three agencies offered the following tips:

  • Do not give to a charity you know nothing about. Call the charity or do some research on your own. Search the name online — with the word “complaints” or “scams.” Check with the Better Business Bureau.
  • Do not donate over the phone unless you are familiar with the organization.
  • For door-to-door solicitors, ask to see the person’s identification and consider avoiding them altogether. Do not feel pressured into giving and allowing someone into your house.
  • Do not give credit card numbers, bank account numbers or other personal financial information over the phone. Never wire money to someone claiming to be a charity.
  • Whenever possible, write a check payable to the charity so you have a record of your donation. Or make a donation directly through a legitimate organization’s secure website, rather than a third-party website.
  • Don’t click links in unsolicited emails or on social media. Unless you previously donated to an organization, assume that an unsolicited donation request by email is a scam. Plus, links in emails or social media can unleash malware.

“It is a terrible thing to see the devastation that is occurring in Texas and throughout the Gulf region,” Secretary of State Pedro Cortés said. “As in any time of great need, generous Pennsylvanians are looking for ways they can help. We want to ensure their donations go to reputable organizations with a proven record of good service.”

Charitable organizations that solicit contributions in Pennsylvania must register with the department’s Bureau of Corporations and Charitable Organizations if their gross annual contributions are more than $25,000. There are some statutory exclusions and exemptions to the registration requirement, for groups such as religious institutions, hospitals, and police, firefighter or veteran organizations.

To determine if a charitable group is properly registered, the public can search the Charities Online Database. The website also provides a list of organizations that have been subject to corrective actions taken by the Bureau. The public may also call 1-800-732-0999.

The Annual Charities Report online contains detailed information about charitable organizations registered in Pennsylvania and professional solicitors and fundraising counsels. For instance, the report outlines what percentage of every donated dollar goes to the charity and how much is charged by the solicitors or counsels for their services.

Attorney General Josh Shapiro noted the importance of protecting yourself while helping others.

“We care deeply about the victims from this terrible storm and want to help any way we can,” said Attorney General Shapiro. “We also want Pennsylvanians to be careful as they donate, and want to help them avoid the scam artists who always surface after natural disasters like this one. Our office is here to help you avoid being scammed.”

More helpful tips about informed giving can be found at the Charities section of the Department of State’s website. 

To file a complaint about any charity soliciting donations in the commonwealth, contact the Division of Investigations/Audits at 717-787-0700, by email at ra-stbeiciu@pa.gov, or by mail at 401 North St., Room 212, Harrisburg, PA, 17120,

If you believe you’ve been scammed, call the Office of Attorney General’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. 1-800-441-2555 or email at scams@attorneygeneral.gov.

The HealthyWoman Program is offering free mammograms and PAP tests to those who qualify.  The HealthyWoman Program is a free breast and cervical cancer early detection program of the Pennsylvania Department of Health. It is funded by the Department of Health and through a grant the department receives from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Click here to learn more.

The Solid Waste Authority web site, www.ycswa.com, will be off-line July 31-August 6, 2017 while they work to make it more user-friendly. If you need to contact them, please call them directly at 717-845-1066 with any inquiries.

The public comment period for the New Regional CBPRP (2018-2023) began today (July 19) and extends through August 18. Additionally, a Public Meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, August 9, at 6:00 pm. It will be held at the West Manchester Township Municipal Building located at 380 East Berlin Road, York. A copy of the Public Notice is attached.

The Draft Plan can be accessed on the York County Planning Commission website for reviewing, printing, and/or downloading. Click here to go directly to the area of their site relevant to this issue.

Following the public comment period, all comments received will be reviewed and changes made to the Draft Plan as needed.

A Free Summer Kids Series is coming to Frank Theatres! Starting June 6th and running through July, 27, 2017 every Tuesday, Wednesday, & Thursday morning at 10am Frank Theatres in the Queensgate Shopping Center will run a FREE family-friendly movie! Limited seating is available so try to arrive early to get seats.

Movie Schedule for 2017:

  • June 6th – 8th: The Angry Birds Movie
  • June 13th – 15th: Trolls
  • June 20th – 22nd: The Iron Giant
  • June 27th – 29th: Sing
  • July 4th – 6th: The Wizard of OZ
  • July 11th – 13th: The Secret Life of Pets
  • July 18th – 20th: The LEGO Batman Movie
  • July 25th – 27th: Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (Original)

Frank Theatres is located in the Queensgate Shopping Center at 2067 Springwood Road in York.

Want to escape the heat this summer? Want the kids to get some exercise? Then you need to check out this FREE bowling program at kidsbowlfree.com. Your kids can bowl 2 FREE games of bowling each and every day of summer for FREE.

SOME MORE INFORMATION ON THE PROGRAM

  • You can sign the kids up at multiple centers but you will need to create another account. Only one unique email address can be used to open an account, so you will need to register with another email address.
  • If you were signed up for the program last year, you will have to re-register this year.
  • If your child does not have bowling shoes, you will need to rent them.
  • Each bowling center has it’s own age limit, so check the individual pages.
  • The online registration process only takes a few minutes. Families that register will receive coupons valid for two free bowling games each day sent to their email address every Sunday morning (the certificates are only available via email, so participants must have access to a computer and printer).

THE FAMILY PASS

When you register for the FREE kids pass, you will have the option of selecting a Family Pass also. This pass allows adult family members to enjoy bowling throughout the summer as well. The Family Pass starts at $36.95 (one time payment) and includes 2 GAMES PER PERSON PER DAY and covers up to 4 adult family members. You may have 1, 2, 3, or 4 adults on the family pass. The price of the pass covers all 4 members.

PARTICIPATING BOWLING CENTERS IN YORK

  • Colony Park Lanes North
  • Laser Alleys
  • Suburban Bowlerama
  • Lion Bowling Center

You can register online HERE!

The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation has released the results of a traffic study in the borough.

Click here to download and view it. If it does not open for you, you may need a PDF reader.

To help eliminate illegal dumping of tires and educate the public about proper tire management, the York County Solid Waste Authority (Authority) is offering free tire disposal for residents at the York County Resource Recovery Center. Pre-registration is required and the program is for York County residents only. Businesses are not eligible to participate.

Residents must pre-register for the program by calling Kelly Megonnel at the Authority at (717) 845-1066 between the hours of 8:00 am and 4:00 pm, Monday through Friday, starting May 1, 2017. Tire deliveries will be scheduled to occur between May 15 and June 12, 2017. Registration ends May 31, 2017. Registrants will receive a dashboard placard for a free one-time disposal of up to 10 tires. Tires must be removed from the rim and may not exceed 32” in diameter. Tires may not be excessively dirty or full of water. This program is limited to one placard per household. The York County Resource Recovery Center can only accept a limited number of tires per day and deliveries will be scheduled on a first come, first served basis.

This program is a result of the Authority’s support of Keep York Beautiful and its efforts to prevent and eliminate illegal dumping. Dave Vollero, Authority Executive Director, notes that “Residents can and should place old tires out with their regular garbage. The special tire acceptance program is being held to raise awareness that tires should be properly disposed of as household waste and to help prevent illegal dumping of tires.” Tires collected at the curb with regular garbage must be removed from the rim and may not exceed 32” in diameter. Residents should call their waste hauler for specifics on how many tires can be placed out with each pick-up.

Tom Smith, Executive Director of Keep York Beautiful, points out that “Proper
management of old tires eliminates potential breeding grounds for mosquitoes and
results in a cleaner and healthier community.”

The Authority facilitates responsible solid waste management through an
integrated strategy that emphasizes waste reduction, reuse, recycling and resource
recovery. The Authority is the owner of the York County Resource Recovery Center in
Manchester Township and conducts a year-round free litter disposal program to
encourage York County residents, organizations, civic groups, schools, and
neighborhoods to clean up litter and illegal dumpsites. Waste collected in clean-up
programs can be disposed of free of charge at the York County Resource Recovery
Center. Pre-registration is required. For more information about the free litter program,
call the Authority at (717) 845-1066.

Keep York Beautiful is an affiliate chapter of Keep America Beautiful and
supporter of Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful. Its mission is to empower York County
residents to make our communities clean and beautiful. Keep York Beautiful
coordinates cleanups across York County and provides education and outreach
programming. Residents interested in helping to clean up an illegal dumpsite should
call Tom Smith at Keep York Beautiful at (717) 840-2375, or email him at:
tls35@psu.edu. Keep York Beautiful will assist by providing free gloves, bags and
safety vests.

Efforts to reform property taxes in Pennsyvania by reducing or eliminating the amount of real estate taxes that fund local school districts has been a hot button issue for the last several years. Join us as Mark Ryan of the Commonweath’s Independent Fiscal Office provides background information and a non-partisan presentation of the methods and options being considered. The IFO provides revenue projections for use in the state budget process along with impartial and timely analysis of fiscal, economic and budgetary issues to assist Commonwealth residents and the General Assembly in their evaluation of policy decisions.

Click here to download the registration form/flyer.

Despite 2017 being the warmest February on record, we are still in the grips of winter as another round of snow appears to be on its way to South Central PA. FirstEnergy meteorologists are closely monitoring the storm track and we are preparing for a significant snowfall across the Met-Ed service area.

We want to remind our customers to prepare in advance for possible power outages. Some steps they can take include:

  • Keep a flashlight and extra batteries handy. Use care when burning candles; open flames are a fire hazard.
  • If you have a water well and pump, keep an emergency supply of bottled water and/or fill your bathtub with fresh water.
  • Stock an emergency supply of convenience foods that do not require cooking.
  • Keep a battery-powered radio with extra batteries on hand.
  • Make sure cell phones and devices are fully charged to ensure you have access to online information sources.
  • If you have a back-up generator, be sure you know how to use it safely.

Customers who experience an interruption in their electric service should call 1-888-LIGHTSS (1-888-544-4877) to report their outage or click the “Report Outage” link on our website www.firstenergycorp.com. Immediately report downed power lines to Met-Ed or the local police or fire department, and never go near a downed power line, even if you think it is no longer energized. Just because it’s not sparking does not mean it is dead. Don’t try to remove trees or tree limbs from power lines. Wait for utility crews to arrive.

Updates on current outages, FirstEnergy’s storm restoration process and additional tips for staying safe are provided on our 24/7 Power Center website at www.firstenergycorp.com/outages.

Harrisburg, PA – The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) urges Pennsylvanians to test their homes for radon in January as part of national Radon Action Month. Colorless, odorless, and radioactive, radon is a known human carcinogen and the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States.

The DEP website provides information and a video on how to test your home, the DEP Facebook and Twitter pages are sharing daily radon tips, and a DEP public service announcement is airing on TV and radio.

Radon occurs naturally from the breakdown of uranium in soil and rocks and enters homes through cracks in the foundation or other openings.

“Because of its geology, Pennsylvania is prone to high radon levels. Radon has been detected in all 67 counties, and about 40 percent of homes have levels above the Environmental Protection Agency action level,” said DEP Acting Secretary Patrick McDonnell. “It’s just good sense to protect yourself and your loved ones.”

The EPA action level is 4 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) of air. In October, a home in southern Lehigh County showed a radon level of 6,176 pCi/L, the highest recorded in the state. That area is near the Reading Prong, a geological section of granite rock that’s historically generated high levels of radon.

Winter is an ideal time to test, because doors and windows are generally closed, producing the most conservative results. High levels of radon tend to be found in basements, but the gas can be found anywhere in the home.

Simple radon test kits are inexpensive and available at home improvement and hardware stores. You can also hire a qualified radon professional.

If your home has a radon level higher than 4 pCi/L, the U.S. Surgeon General and EPA recommend taking action. A professionally installed radon reduction system, using a vent pipe and exhaust fan, will help prevent the radon from entering your home and discharge it outside. Compared with the associated risk of lung cancer, these systems are very affordable, generally in the price range of other common home improvements. An added benefit: having a radon reduction system makes the future sale of your home easier.

Pennsylvania law requires all professional radon testers, mitigators and laboratories to be certified by DEP, and the department provides a list of certified radon service providers. People can also obtain a hard copy or verify a company’s certification by calling 800-23RADON (800-237-2366).

If you’re building a new home, DEP recommends installing a passive radon system during construction. There is no reliable way to test the ground in advance for radon, and the cost of installing the radon system during construction should be less than installing one after the fact.

For people buying or selling a home, Pennsylvania’s Real Estate Seller Disclosure Act requires sellers to disclose the results of any known radon testing. The DEP website lists radon testing options for real estate transactions.

The DEP Radon Division may be contacted by email at ra-epbrpenvprt@pa.gov or by phone at (800) 237-2366 or (717) 783-3594.

Make 2017 a safer, healthier year. Test your home for radon, and share this information with your friends and neighbors.

Sixteen York County police departments currently partner with the York County Solid Waste Authority (YCSWA) to host medication take-back boxes in their police department lobbies. In 2016, the program safely collected and disposed of a total of 4.2 tons of unused and expired medications, an increase of 2.03 tons over the 2.23 tons collected in 2015.

This partnership program provides a secure disposal option for unwanted medications from residential sources at no cost to the public or to law enforcement agencies. All York County police departments have been invited to participate and the program remains open to any police departments in York County that wish to host a MedReturn box. The secure medication take-back boxes, purchased by YCSWA from MedReturn, work like a mailbox: once medications are deposited, they cannot be retrieved and are contained in a locked compartment accessible only by law enforcement. The heavy-duty green metal box can be secured to the floor and/or wall. Medications collected in the take-back box program are delivered by law enforcement to the Authority’s waste-to-energy facility for safe and complete destruction. Law enforcement also maintains the box and secures medications that are received until they can be destroyed.

Northern York County Regional Police Department was the first police department in York County to host a MedReturn take-back box. Says Chief Mark Bentzel: “This program enhances our ongoing efforts to eliminate drug abuse, provides a safe and convenient means of disposing of prescription and over the counter drugs and presents an opportunity to educate the general public about the potential for abuse of medications”.

The Authority’s waste-to-energy facility is equipped with state of the art combustion technology and air emission controls making it York County’s best waste management tool for destruction of unwanted or expired prescription or over-the-counter medication. The facility’s operator, Covanta York Renewable Energy, also supports this program.

Notes Dave Vollero, Authority Executive Director, “Using waste-to-energy technology to manage medications keeps them out of landfills and waste water treatment systems. We have long advised residents to make medications unrecognizable and unpalatable and place them out with their regular garbage for delivery to our facility. For those residents not comfortable
with placing medication out at the curb, the take-back box program offers a convenient and secure option that achieves the same results: safe management, complete destruction and production of alternative energy.”

Residents interested in dropping medication at a take-back box location should remove their personal information from containers before depositing them in boxes. ONLY RESIDENTIAL prescription or over-the-counter medications are accepted. Pharmacies, hospitals and other commercial sources of medications are not eligible to participate. Syringes and other “sharps” are not accepted in this program. The public may deposit unwanted medications anonymously in the take-back boxes during lobby hours as listed below, except on holidays.

Carroll Township Police Department, 555 Chestnut Grove Road, Dillsburg, PA. Open Monday through Friday, 8:30AM to 4:30PM

City of York Police Department, 50 West King Street, York, PA. Open Monday through Friday from 6AM to 10:30PM.

Fairview Township Police Department, 145 Limekiln Road, Suite 600, New Cumberland, PA. Open Monday through Friday from 8AM to 4:30PM.

Hanover Borough Police Department, 44 Frederick Street, Hanover, PA. Open Monday through Friday from 8AM to 4:30PM.

Hellam Township Police Department, 44 Walnut Springs Road, York, PA. Open Monday through Friday from 8AM to 4:30PM.

Newberry Township Police Department, 1905 Old Trail Road, Etters, PA. Open Monday through Friday from 8:30AM to 4:30PM.

Northeastern Regional Police Department, 5570 Board Road, Mount Wolf, PA. Open Monday through Friday from 7:30AM to 4PM.

Northern York County Regional Police Department, 1445 East Canal Road, Dover, PA. Open Monday through Friday from 8AM to 4:30PM.

Penn Township Police Department, 20 Wayne Avenue, Hanover, PA. Open Monday through Friday from 8AM to 4:30PM.

Southern Regional Police Department, 47 E. High Street, New Freedom, PA. Open Monday through Friday from 8AM to 4PM.

Southwestern Regional Police Department, 6115 Thoman Drive, Spring Grove, PA. Open Monday through Friday from 8AM to 4:30PM.

Spring Garden Township Police Department, 340 Tri Hill Road in Spring Garden Township. Open Monday through Friday from 8AM to 4:30PM.

Springettsbury Township Police Department, 1501 Mount Zion Road, York, PA. Open Monday through Friday from 8AM to 5PM.

West Manchester Township Police Department, 380 East Berlin Road, York, PA. Open Monday through Friday from 8AM to 4:30PM.

West York Borough Police Department, 1700 West Philadelphia Street, York, PA. Open Monday through Friday, 9AM to 4:30PM

York Area Police Department, 33 Oak Street, York, PA. Open Monday through Friday from 8AM to 5PM.

For more information about the program, visit the Authority’s web site at: www.ycswa.com. The Authority facilitates responsible solid waste management through an integrated system that emphasizes waste reduction, reuse, recycling and resource recovery. The Authority is the owner of the York County Resource Recovery Center in Manchester Township. The Resource Recovery Center manages York County’s household and commercial waste, as well as some manufacturing waste.

The York County Solid Waste Authority is conducting a free Christmas tree recycling program for all York County residents. The program starts December 26, 2016 and continues through January 31, 2017. Residents may bring their trees to the Authority’s Yard Waste Transfer Facility in Manchester Township seven days a week during daylight hours. In addition to the Authority’s collection site, the following businesses are accepting Christmas trees: Spring Valley Mulch in Dover, 292-3476; H & H General Excavating in Spring Grove, 225-4669 and Mighty Oak Mulch in Wrightsville, 244-3099. Please call these locations for hours and directions. Please note: Trees are no longer accepted at Kain County Park.

There is no fee to residents for this program. PLEASE REMOVE: ornaments, tinsel, lights and protective bags from your tree. Many municipalities now offer curbside Christmas tree collection for their residents. Call your municipal office to see if your municipality offers a curbside collection program. Dedicated loads of Christmas trees collected in municipal programs will be accepted at no charge during regular business hours at the Authority’s Yard Waste Transfer Facility. Trees collected will be shipped off site to an end user.

Directions to the Yard Waste Transfer Facility:

From I-83: Proceed on I-83 to Exit 21. As you come off the exit ramp, get immediately into the far left turning lane and proceed to stoplight at intersection of Toronita Street and Rt. 30E (you will see the “Round the Clock Diner” at this intersection).

At the stoplight, turn left onto Toronita Street (Toronita turns into Blackbridge Road). Proceed approximately 2 miles to Flour Mill Road. Turn right on Flour Mill Road, the Yard Waste Transfer Facility will be on your right.

From Rt. 30: At the stoplight at the intersection of Toronita Street and Rt. 30 (you will see the “Round the Clock Diner” at this intersection), turn north onto Toronita Street (Toronita turns into Blackbridge Road). Proceed approximately 2 miles to Flour Mill Road. Turn right onto Flour Mill Road, the Yard Waste Transfer Facility will be on your right.

This is the 29th year the Authority has conducted a Christmas tree recycling program. The Authority facilitates responsible solid waste management through an integrated strategy that emphasizes waste reduction, education, recycling and resource recovery. The Authority is the owner of the York County Resource Recovery Center in Manchester Township; and owns and operates a Yard Waste Transfer Facility, a Recyclable Materials Drop-off Center and an Education Center.

Greetings from Met-Ed!

As we face the colder temperatures outside, may the good cheer of friends and family keep you warm inside this Holiday Season!

Below are some tips and information that may be useful to you and your residents or constituents. Feel free to share.

Thank you for all you do on behalf of our communities. It is a pleasure to serve you!

Kathy Seilhamer
Met-Ed External Affairs

Holiday Lighting Safety Reminder

Holiday lights are a tradition that reaches back to the earliest days of electricity, and now is the most popular time for home decoration. Met-Ed hopes everyone will enjoy this festive season while also remembering a few tips to help ensure the holidays remain safe.

Outdoor Lighting Safety:

• Check all lights for frayed wires or areas where insulation has pulled away from plugs or sockets. Discard and replace any damaged light strings.
• Ensure that tacks or nails used to hold light strings do not pierce any insulation on wires or light sockets.
• Use only extension cords that are approved for outdoor use. These cords must meet rigorous safety standards that indoor cords may not meet.
• Outdoor lights, inflatables and other decorations should be plugged into outlets protected by ground fault interrupters.
• Place outdoor lights on a timer or turn them off before you go to bed.
• Outdoor lights, inflatables and other decorations must not be installed under or near any electric power lines.

Indoor Lighting Safety:

• Inspect all light strings and cords for any damage, including frayed wires or insulation that has pulled away from light sockets or plugs. Also check for chewing or scratching damage if you have pets in the house. Discard and replace any damaged light strings.
• Live trees should be kept well-watered.
• No more than three strings of standard indoor lights should be connected to any extension cord.
• Make sure cords are placed where they won’t be stepped on, kinked or pose a tripping hazard.
• Lights should not be permitted to touch drapes, furniture or carpeting.
• Lights should be turned off overnight and when no one is home.

Met-Ed Offers Energy-Saving Tips as Frigid Weather Approaches

With the possibility of below-zero temperatures affecting much of the eastern United States this week, Met-Ed reminds customers of steps they can take to better manage energy bills that may climb as the frigid weather lingers.

• Make sure your home is properly insulated to help reduce heat loss.
• Inspect doors and windows and apply caulk or weather stripping where necessary to keep cold air out.
• Close drapes, blinds and garage doors to retain heat.
• Keep your thermostat at a temperature where you feel comfortable. Each degree lower has the potential to save about 2 percent on your heating bill. Install a programmable thermostat and it will do the work for you.
• Have a professional tune-up and inspect your furnace.
• Clean or replace the furnace filter to improve efficiency.
• Make sure heat can get into the room. Keep furniture and drapes from blocking heat registers and return vents.
• Close the vents in rooms that are not being used.

Met-Ed Completing Long-Term Infrastructure Improvement Plan

Met-Ed is completing work on approximately $7.5 million of electric system projects as part of its 2016 Long-Term Infrastructure Improvement Plan to reduce the number and duration of service interruptions experienced by the company’s 560,000 customers.

“These projects benefit customers by complementing the work we already do each year to enhance the reliability of our electric system,” said Ed Shuttleworth, regional president of Met-Ed. “Our goal is to make our system the best it can be when it comes to limiting the number of outages our customers experience.”

Projects completed this year in the Met-Ed service area include:

• Replacement of more than 1,600 porcelain protective switches on poles and wires with new polymer devices. The switches – known as “cutouts” – automatically open up when a system irregularity is detected, serving to protect the electrical equipment and limit the number of customers affected by an outage. In 2016, protective switches were replaced on six circuits primarily in Boyertown, Reading, Easton and York.
• Installation of radio-controlled switches on electric circuits. These devices can be operated remotely from the company dispatch center, allowing operators to restore power more quickly and efficiently than dispatching a crew to investigate. Met-Ed is completing this work at almost 70 locations throughout its service area.
• Replacement of 4,300 feet of cable in a Reading-area underground development.
• Installation of more than 1,000 new fuses on 91 circuits throughout Met-Ed’s service area.

In 2017, Met-Ed is expected to spend an additional $9 million on similar Long-Term Infrastructure Improvement Plan projects.

The York County Solid Waste Authority has approved a contract extension with its current vendor, ECOvanta, to provide electronics recycling services free of charge to York County residents through 2017.

Under PA Act 108 (the state’s Covered Device Recycling Act), it is unlawful for Pennsylvania landfills and resource recovery facilities to accept specific electronic devices (computers, computer peripherals and televisions) for disposal. PA waste haulers are also prohibited from collecting these electronics for disposal. Under the Act, manufacturers who sell their electronic products in PA must contribute financial support to electronics recycling programs. Unfortunately, the financial support required of those manufacturers by Act 108 falls short of the actual costs of recycling all devices collected in the Commonwealth and, as a result, many electronics recycling programs in PA are underfunded, or simply no longer exist.

In 2017, residential electronics will be collected at three locations:

• In the York County Solid Waste Authority’s contractor parking area on Black Bridge Road in Manchester Township directly across the street from the York County Resource Recovery Center. Electronics recycling is conducted every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

• Fairview Township’s Electronic Recycling Center is open to all York County residents. Summer/Fall (April-Oct.) hours are Monday – Saturday, 8:00a.m.to 4:30 p.m. Winter/Spring (Nov.-March) hours are Monday – Friday, 9:00 a.m. to Noon and the 1st & 3rd Saturday of every month, from 8:00am-4:30 p.m. The electronics drop off site is located at the Yard Waste Facility, 55 Fairview Road, New Cumberland, PA 17070.

• Penn Township Recycling Drop-off Center is open to all York County residents. The Center is located at 1020 Wilson Avenue, Hanover, PA 17331, and is open Monday – Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. and Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

*Please Note: In 2017, the Authority will limit the number of TV’s accepted to: FIVE TVs PER VISIT.

Businesses, schools and organizations: York County businesses, schools and organizations are not eligible to participate in any of the residential electronics recycling programs described above. Businesses must make their own arrangements with an electronics recycling vendor to properly manage their electronics. A list of vendors is located on our website at www.ycswa.com.

The Authority facilitates responsible solid waste management through an integrated system that emphasizes waste reduction, reuse, recycling and resource recovery. The Authority is the owner of the York County Resource Recovery Center in Manchester Township. The Resource Recovery Center manages York County’s household and commercial waste, as well as some manufacturing waste.

Reading, Pa. – For the fourth year, Metropolitan Edison Company (Met-Ed) invites customers to show off their best and brightest outdoor holiday light displays by entering its “Merry & Bright” Holiday Lights Photo Contest.

Participants can enter by submitting a photo of their home’s outdoor holiday lights at the Met-Ed Facebook page (www.facebook.com/MetEdElectric) from Nov. 28 until Dec. 18. Up to 10 finalists will be selected by Met-Ed based on criteria such as creativity and number of lights. Finalists’ photos will be posted on Facebook for public voting from Dec. 19 until Dec. 26.

The grand prize winner will receive a $250 Visa® gift card and the first prize winner will receive a $100 gift card.

More information, including complete contest rules, will be posted to the Met-Ed Facebook page. The “Merry & Bright” contest is open only to Met-Ed customers who are legal residents of Pennsylvania and who are at least 18 years of age. Only one entry per household will be accepted. Employees and family members of FirstEnergy, Met-Ed or its advertising agency are not eligible.

Photos of the winning entries from 2015 can be found on Flickr.

Met-Ed is a subsidiary of FirstEnergy Corp. (NYSE: FE) and serves approximately 560,000 customers in 15 Pennsylvania counties. Connect with Met-Ed on
Twitter @Met_Ed, on Facebook at www.facebook.com/MetEdElectric, and online at
www.met-ed.com.

Akron, Ohio – Across the country, con artists continue using scare tactics in an effort to steal money and personal information from utility customers. As part of FirstEnergy Corp.’s (NYSE: FE) ongoing efforts to raise awareness about this continuing problem, the company is joining more than two dozen electric and gas utilities across the United States and Canada to recognize November 16 as “Utilities United Against Scams Day.”

“We take our customers’ safety and security very seriously,” said Gary W. Grant, vice president of customer service for FirstEnergy Utilities. “Through our website, social media outreach, newsletters and participation in industry efforts such as Utilities United Against Scams Day, we continue working to educate customers about scam activity and help them avoid falling victim to con artists who are posing as representatives of our company.”

Scam artists impersonating utility company employees have targeted victims through door-to-door visits, phone calls, and electronic communications. The criminals often try to instill fear that power will be disconnected if the victim does not comply with the demands. Customers have reported the theft of money, personal data and valuables.

FirstEnergy’s award-winning Scam and Fraud Information website describes some of the most widespread schemes targeting utility customers, and offers facts and safety reminders that can help customers avoid becoming a victim of these crimes.

Scams listed on the site include:

• Power shut-off scam: In this nationwide scam, customers have reported receiving
phone calls from someone who claims to be associated with their utility. The
caller threatens to shut off the customer’s power unless an immediate payment is
made, and the customer is often instructed to use a pre-paid debit card or a money
transfer service.

• Door-to-door solicitation: In this scam, individuals go door-to-door, claiming to
be affiliated with the utility company. The scam artists often work in pairs, and
have been characterized as very persistent. These individuals may inquire about
the resident’s electric service or rate, and ask to review a copy of the current
electric bill or other documents. Police and media reports indicate that in some
cases, after distracting the resident, these individuals have stolen property and
personal information.

• Bogus fees for equipment: Customers have reported receiving phone calls
demanding a separate payment to replace an electric meter or other equipment. In
many cases, the caller threatens customers with disconnection unless an
immediate payment is made.

“Customers who have questions about their account status or the identity of
someone who claims to be one of our employees should immediately call our customer
contact centers,” Grant said. “We also urge customers to report any suspicious activity to
the police, and to let us know if they believe they have been targeted by a scam.”
Customers are encouraged to share this information with friends and family to
continue raising awareness of these crimes, and to revisit the Scam and Fraud
Information page on FirstEnergy’s website periodically to check for updates on emerging
scam activity.

In addition to understanding how criminals target their victims, the website offers reminders to help ensure customer safety and security, including:

• FirstEnergy employees will not contact customers to request sensitive information such as social security numbers or bank account information, and they will not demand immediate payment over the phone. Customers who are behind on their accounts receive written notice of their account status, along with instructions on how to avoid a disconnection of service.

• Do not allow anyone claiming to be a utility employee into your home unless an appointment has been scheduled and the employee has provided proper identification.

• FirstEnergy’s utilities offer a wide array of billing and payment options, and will never insist on a particular method of payment. Only send your payments to your FirstEnergy utility company.

• If you have any doubts about the status of your electric account or the identity of a company representative, call your utility company using the numbers below, which are also listed on FirstEnergy’s website.

Utility Company Customer Service Numbers:
Ohio Edison 1-800-633-4766
The Illuminating Company 1-800-589-3101
Toledo Edison 1-800-447-3333
Met-Ed 1-800-545-7741
Penelec 1-800-545-7741
Penn Power 1-800-720-3600
West Penn Power 1-800-686-0021
Jersey Central Power & Light 1-800-662-3115
Mon Power 1-800-686-0022
Potomac Edison 1-800-686-0011

FirstEnergy is dedicated to safety, reliability and operational excellence. Its 10 electric distribution companies form one of the nation’s largest investor-owned electric systems, serving customers in Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, West Virginia, Maryland and New York. Follow FirstEnergy on Twitter @FirstEnergyCorp.

Wilkes-Barre, PA – The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) has detected a new record-high level of radon and is once again encouraging state residents to test their homes for this radioactive gas, a leading cause of lung cancer.

In October, a home in southern Lehigh County showed a radon level of 6,176 picocuries per liter (pCi/L), the highest recorded in the state. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has set an action level for radon concentration in homes at 4 pCi/L. Homes testing above this level should have a radon reduction system installed.

“We encourage people to buy a radon home test kit and take the steps necessary to protect themselves and their families,” said DEP Acting Secretary Patrick McDonnell. “Fall and winter are an ideal time to test, because the gas becomes trapped inside when doors and windows are closed.”

Radon is a colorless, odorless, radioactive gas that occurs naturally through the breakdown of uranium in soil and rocks. It can enter a home through cracks in the foundation or other openings.

The National Toxicology Program, comprising the National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Food and Drug Administration, classifies radon as a known human carcinogen. Scientists estimate that about 20,000 lung cancer deaths yearly are related to radon. It’s the leading cause of lung cancer in nonsmokers and second leading cause in smokers.

Because of its geology, Pennsylvania is prone to high radon levels. Radon has been detected in all 67 counties, and about 40 percent of homes in the state have levels above EPA’s action level. In 2014, a number of homes in the southern Lehigh County area were found to have radon levels over 1,000 pCi/L. That area is near the Reading Prong, a geological section of granite rock that historically has generated high levels of radon.

Testing is the only way to know if a home, school, workplace or other structure has elevated levels of radon. An easy home test kit can be purchased at hardware or home improvement stores for about $20 to $30. People may also hire a state-certified testing company.

If a level above 4 pCi/L is found, a radon mitigation, or reduction, system should be installed. This is essentially a pipe with a fan to suction the gas from the ground and discharge it above the roofline, where the radon is dispersed. DEP recommends that home builders install radon reduction systems during construction.

DEP certifies all radon testers, mitigators and laboratories doing business in the state, to ensure reliable results.

For more information, including information on interpreting radon test results and finding a Pennsylvania-certified radon contractor, visit the DEP Radon Division web site or call 800-23-RADON (800-237-2366).

The best time to prepare for winter’s chilly weather is now, while the sun is still shining.

Stay safe by using a professional contractor to clean and tune your furnace or other heating equipment each year. Regular maintenance can help equipment run more efficiently, extend its life expectancy and prevent risks like carbon monoxide poisoning.

Check out Columbia Gas participating contractors* in your area:

  • Ken Adams Mechanical, York, 717-624-9250
  • MT Heating and Cooling, York, 717-745-3665
  • Stambaugh Plumbing and Heating, Inc., New Salem, 717-792-9342

If you suspect carbon monoxide poisoning or a natural gas leak, evacuate immediately and call 911 from a safe location.

Columbia Gas commitment to customer safety

Last month, Columbia Gas contractors and employees provided free maintenance services to more than 50 elderly and disabled customers to keep them safe and warm. Columbia Gas also helped eligible customers pay for the necessary safety repairs through our Emergency Repair Program.

Harrisburg, PA – Pennsylvanians have more options to dispose of unwanted and expired medicines and pharmaceutical drugs thanks to enactment of HB 1737, part of the opioid epidemic package of bills signed by Gov. Wolf.

“With this new legislation we want to remind PA residents that there are safe ways to dispose of unwanted and expired medicines,” said Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Acting Secretary Patrick McDonnell. “We want to encourage everyone to safely and responsibly dispose of medicines and other pharmaceuticals rather than just flush them down the drain or send them to a landfill.”

The law allows pharmaceuticals delivered to collection events to be incinerated at permitted facilities, instead of solely being disposed of as hazardous waste, and allows collection events conducted by law enforcement, medical facilities, pharmacies, and resource recovery facilities incinerating the pharmaceuticals to be exempt from registering with DEP prior to commencing operations.

“We hope that changing prior disposal restrictions will encourage more collection events to enable people to dispose of expired and unwanted drugs,” said McDonnell.

The Department encourages organizations hosting collection events to contact Pennsylvania’s Department of Drug and Alcohol or the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration for help in publicizing the events and for guidance on disposal options.

For more information on prescription drug disposal please visit the DEP website.

Harrisburg, PA – In an effort to help protect stream health and aquatic life, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) would like to remind private and public pool owners, as well as pool management companies, how to properly close their swimming pools for the season.

Discharged pool water and waters containing chlorine or other chemicals can be detrimental to aquatic life if not handled responsibly. It is extremely important that these waters are handled correctly. Pool waters must not be discharged to any storm sewer or land in which a storm sewer is accessible. Runoff can cause fish kills and unsafe aquatic conditions.

“Pool owners and professional pool cleaners need to dispose of old water appropriately and conscientiously,” said Acting DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell. “Most of all, we need to make sure the wastewater is going into the sanitary sewer, where it may be allowed – and not into our storm sewers where it could harm aquatic life.”

When draining a swimming pool this year, make sure to protect Pennsylvania by following these tips:

Pool water may be disposed of through the sanitary sewer system ONLY with municipal permission.
Never dispose of pool water through a storm sewer, which will discharge to a stream.
If lowering the water level of the pool, let it drain to a lawn to prevent it from running off into a storm sewer.
If a sanitary sewer system is not available, water may be used for irrigation if it does not run off the property or into a storm sewer.

The discharge of swimming pool water to any waters of the commonwealth without a permit is a violation of the Clean Streams Law. Property owners and pool companies that violate this law may be prosecuted and penalized for damages.

DEP update on Zika surveillance and response

Harrisburg, PA – The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection has released results of surveillance for Aedes mosquitoes, which have been found to be vectors of the Zika virus. At this time, there have not been any cases of Zika transmitted locally in Pennsylvania, nor have mosquitoes tested positive for the virus.

Twenty-six counties in Pennsylvania have active surveillance sites for albopictus mosquitoes, commonly known as Asian Tiger mosquitoes. The mosquitoes are predominantly found in southern and eastern counties. There have not been any specimens of Aedes aegypti collected, which are the primary carrier of Zika in South America. Aedes aegypti have not been found in Pennsylvania since 2002.

Counties conducting surveillance and approximate locations can be found beginning on page 15 of the DEP/PA Department of Health Zika Response Plan. Surveillance statistics for the week ending July 30, 2016 are below.

In addition, in early August, DEP and the Philadelphia Health Department and the Chester County Health Department responded to two imported clusters of travel associated Zika virus cases per the protocols outlined in the Zika Response Plan. Mosquitoes collected in the Philadelphia cluster response activities were tested for Zika and all samples came back negative. Mosquito trapping in Chester County did not find significant populations of the Asian tiger mosquito and samples were not tested.

“The surveillance and cluster response by DEP and county governments has gone exactly to the Zika response plan, and I am pleased to note that there is no evidence of the Zika virus being carried by mosquitoes in Pennsylvania,” said acting DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell. “I want to continue to encourage residents to take common-sense actions like wearing insect repellant and eliminating standing water to cut down on mosquito activity.”

The following counties in south central PA recorded an average of more than 24 Aedes albopictus mosquitoes per trap (Pest levels are defined as greater than 24 female Aedes albopictus per trapping event):

  • Franklin
  • York
  • Dauphin
  • Lancaster
  • Berks

The following counties in south central PA recorded the presence of Aedes albopictus, but populations have not reached pest level:

  • Adams
  • Cumberland
  • Lebanon

DEP recommends that residents do simple activities to reduce mosquito activity in their areas:

  • Dispose of cans, buckets, plastic containers, ceramic pots, or similar containers that hold water.
  • Properly dispose of discarded tires that can collect water. Stagnant water is where most mosquitoes breed.
  • Drill holes in the bottom of outdoor recycling containers.
  • Have clogged roof gutters cleaned every year as the leaves from surrounding trees have a tendency to plug drains.
  • Turn over wheelbarrows and plastic wading pools when not in use and don’t let water stagnate in birdbaths.
  • Aerate ornamental pools or stock them with fish.
  • Clean and chlorinate swimming pools not in use and remove any water that may collect on pool covers.
  • Wear insect repellant during times of mosquito activity. Aedes mosquitoes are active during daylight hours
  • Keep doors and windows tightly closed, or ensure that screens do not have holes or tears that can allow mosquitoes to get inside the house

“These mosquitoes are weak fliers, so if you see them, they are likely breeding nearby,” said Matt Helwig, program specialist in DEP’s Vector Management program. “Simple precautions to eliminate potential habitat and avoid contact can lead to a safe and itch-free summer.”

To read the Zika Response Plan click here.

After much consideration it has been decided to cancel all public meetings until further notice, this includes the April Council meeting. In addition the playground equipment is closed to the public at this time; however the park remains open.


The Borough Office is closed, but the Secretary is working remotely and will be answering calls, and responding to email during normal business hours.


Anyone who has not yet joined our email alert system is encouraged to do so at this time by emailing Diana at Secretary@YoeBorough.org.

No bill payments for Water, Sewer or Tax bills are payable at the Borough office. Each payment needs to be sent to the address listed on the invoice. Yoe Borough is not responsible for any late fees or penalties for payments sent to the Borough in error. Taxes may be paid at the Borough office ONLY on the dates and times provided by the taxing authority.
News Articles
  • Trash & Recycling during COVID-19 Crisis

    CONTACT: Ellen O’Connor – 717-968-1698 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE March 31, 2020 The York County Solid Waste Authority Suspends Residential Electronics Recycling during Covid-19 Pandemic  The York County Solid Waste Authority has suspended residential electronics recycling ...
    READ MORE
  • GOOD NEWS!

    Park & Free Little Library OPEN It has been a tough few weeks, kids are at home, a lot of us are not working, we are lucky if we can find ...
    READ MORE
  • Republic Services COVID-19 Operations

    Covid-19 Coronavirus Update: Effective 3/30/2020 Residential Operations will run as follows: Trash Collection: Normal Schedule Bulk (Large Item) Collection Temporarily suspended until further notice We are implementing this temporary change so that we can ...
    READ MORE
  • Important Tax Information

    The scheduled April 6th tax sitting has been cancelled. Any tax payments should be mailed, or taken to Fulton Bank for processing. The York Adams Tax Bureau is ...
    READ MORE
  • Yoe’s Free Little Library

    Thank you everyone who has been visiting Yoe’s Free Little Library. We are thrilled with the amount of traffic the library is receiving. While we try to visit ...
    READ MORE
MORE NEWS
Weather